www.meganjoychapman.com

Author of Lion Heart & Alessio: The Victory Ride Series

Goût de France: Goat Cheese, Fig, and Prosciutto Galette

goat cheese, fig, and prosciutto galette

Inspired by Mediterranean cuisine, the pairing of tangy goat cheese, sweet figs, and salty prosciutto has become quite popular in the States. You’ll find tons of recipes on the internet using the trendy trio, so without reinventing the wheel completely, I came up with something a little different using my own Fig Preserves.

My Goat Cheese, Fig, and Prosciutto Galette is so good it’ll make ya wanna slap your granny. At least that’s how my husband describes it. He’s southern (hence the lingo) and grew up eating his grandmothers fig preserves on warm biscuits, so I trust his judgment. But I have to say; the puff pastry along with velvety goat cheese and crispy prosciutto takes this recipe over the top. It works perfectly served as a hors d’oeuvre or dessert. Bon Appetit!

Goat Cheese, Fig, and Prosciutto Galette Ingredients

1 puff pastry thawed 30 minutes
Flour for dusting
1 oz. (about 2 tablespoons) goat cheese, room temperature (this will be added after the galette is cooked)
8 oz. jar fig jam (about ¾ cup) usually found in the specialty food section of your grocery store or try my Fig Preserves recipe. If you make my recipe, make sure to blend the preserves in a food process till smooth or jam-like consistency.
2 slices prosciutto, chopped
1 teaspoon extra virgin olive oil
1 egg
1 tablespoon water

Goat Cheese, Fig, and Prosciutto Galette Instructions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In a small bowl, whisk together the egg and water and set aside. In a heated skillet, add olive oil and sauté prosciutto till crisp. Set aside. On parchment paper, roll pastry out until it measures about 10” square (you may need flour to keep the rolling pin from sticking). Spread the fig jam onto the center of the pastry into a 7” circle. If you live in a warm climate, you may need to pop the galette into the freezer at this point for 10 minutes to firm up. Cold pastry is key to a flakey crust.

goat cheese, fig, and prosciutto galette-step 1

Fold and pinch the edges of the pastry in towards the center so the fig filling is exposed with a generous crust around the edges. With a pastry brush, brush the edges of the crust with the egg mixture. This will give it a golden sheen. Transfer the parchment with the galette onto a baking sheet and bake till golden brown and bubbly, about 20-25 minutes.

goat cheese, fig, and prosciutto galette-step 2

Crumble the goat cheese on top of the hot fig filling and garnish with crispy prosciutto. Allow the galette to rest at least 10 minutes before cutting and serving. I like to serve this at room temperature. Makes 8 small pie slices.

Goat Cheese, Fig, and Prosciutto Galette

More Galette Recipes

Gouda with Caramelized Onion, Fennel, and Apple Sausage Galette
Brie and Apple Galette
Gruyere, Prosciutto, and Poppy Seed Galette

Read this story from the beginning

Goût de France: Thanks, Mom!

Click here to check out Megan’s educational adventure book for kids ages 8-12!

 

Goût de France: Gruyere, Prosciutto, and Poppy Seed Galette

Gruyere, Prosciutto, and Poppy Seed Galette

My Gruyere, Prosciutto, and Poppy Seed Galette is reminiscent of a recipe my mom used to make for football watching lazy Sundays—I think she borrowed the recipe from a friend. Anyway, they were called Tailgate Hot Ham and Cheese Sandwiches and made on onion rolls, wrapped individually in foil, and baked till oozy and bursting with flavor. I’ve altered the recipe to work with puff pastry and fanced it up with prosciutto and Gruyere. This is my husband’s favorite savory galette by far. Serve with a side salad and voila! Dinner is served. Bon Appetit!

Gruyere, Prosciutto, and Poppy Seed Galette Ingredients

1 puff pastry thawed 30 minutes
Flour for dusting
1 ½ cups Gruyere cheese, grated
5 slices prosciutto, chopped
3 tablespoons unsalted butter, softened (the prosciutto adds a salty bite, so unsalted butter is recommended)
1 teaspoon poppy seeds (with extra for garnish)
1 generous tablespoon shallot, minced
2 teaspoons Dijon mustard
Dash of Worcestershire
1 egg
1 tablespoon water

Gruyere, Prosciutto, and Poppy Seed Galette Instructions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In a small bowl, whisk together the egg and water and set aside. In another small bowl with a fork, mix together softened butter, poppy seeds, shallots, Dijon, and Worcestershire. On parchment paper, roll pastry out until it measures about 10” square (you may need flour to keep rolling pin from sticking). Spread the butter mixture onto the center of the pastry into a 7” circle.

Gruyere, Prosciutto, and Poppy Seed Galette Step 1

Add the prosciutto.

Gruyere, Prosciutto, and Poppy Seed Galette - Step 2

Then add the cheese.

Gruyere, Prosciutto, and Poppy Seed Galette - Step 3

If you live in a warm climate you may need to pop the galette into the freezer at this point for 10 minutes to firm up. Cold pastry is key to a flakey crust.

Once firm enough, fold and pinch the edges of the pastry in towards the center so that the filling is exposed with a generous crust around the edges. With a pastry brush, brush the edges of the crust with the egg mixture. This will give it a golden sheen. Sprinkle the top with poppy seeds.

Gruyere, Prosciutto, and Poppy Seed Galette - Step 4

Transfer the parchment with the galette onto a baking sheet and bake till golden brown and bubbly, about 20-25 minutes. Allow the galette to rest at least 10 minutes before cutting and serving. This will give the melted butter a chance to set. Makes 8 small pie slices.

Gruyere, Prosciutto, and Poppy Seed Galette

Related Links

Gouda with Caramelized Onion, Fennel, and Apple Sausage Galette
Goat Cheese, Fig, and Prosciutto Galette
Brie and Apple Galette

Read this story from the beginning

Goût de France: Thanks, Mom!

Click here to check out Megan’s educational adventure book for kids ages 8-12!

 

Goût de France: Brie and Apple Galette

Brie and Apple Galette

If you want a quick substitution for apple pie but don’t want to spend all day baking, my Brie and Apple Galette is easy elegance at its best. But you don’t have to wait for autumn or the holidays to roll around to make it. Any night of the week, it’ll satisfy the most stubborn sweet tooth. The brie is subtle and melts into the buttery pastry and the sweet apple and cinnamon spice is warm and comforting. Serve as a hors d’oeuvre or dessert. Bon Appetit!

Brie and Apple Galette Ingredients

1 puff pastry thawed 30 minutes
Flour for dusting
5 oz. of brie sliced (about 1 cup)
1 Granny Smith apple, thinly sliced
¼ cup sugar
¼ teaspoon cinnamon
2 tablespoons butter, cut up
1 egg
1 tablespoon water

Brie and Apple Galette Instructions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In a small bowl, whisk together the egg and water and set aside. In another small bowl, mix together the sugar and cinnamon. On parchment paper, roll pastry out until it measures about 10” square (you may need to add flour to keep the rolling pin from sticking to the pastry). Place sliced brie in the center of the pastry into a 7” circle.

Brie and Apple Galette Step 1
Add the apple slices and arrange into a decorative circle.

Brie and Apple Galette Step 2

Top with the sugar mixture and dollops of butter. If you live in a warm climate, you may need to pop the galette into the freezer at this point for 10 minutes to firm up. Cold pastry is key to a flakey crust.

When firm enough fold and pinch the edges of the pastry in towards the center so that the filling is exposed with a generous crust around the edges. Then with a pastry brush, brush the edges of the crust with the egg mixture. This will give it a golden sheen.

Brie and Apple Galette Step 3

Transfer the parchment with the galette onto a baking sheet and bake till golden brown and bubbly, about 20-25 minutes. Allow the galette to rest at least 10 minutes before cutting and serving. I like to serve this at room temperature once the juices have set. Makes 8 small pie slices.

Brie and Apple Galette

More Galette Recipes

Gouda with Caramelized Onion, Fennel, and Apple Sausage Galette
Goat Cheese, Fig, and Prosciutto Galette
Gruyere, Prosciutto, and Poppy Seed Galette

Read this story from the beginning

Goût de France: Thanks, Mom!

Click here to check out Megan’s educational adventure book for kids ages 8-12!

Goût de France: Gouda, Caramelized Onion, Fennel, and Apple Sausage Galette

Gouda, Caramelized Onion, Fennel, and Apple Sausage Galette

I’m having a love affair with galettes. They’re so easy, versatile, and satisfying— and a lot of fun to create. They work as an appetizer, main dish, or dessert. You can experiment with your own favorite flavors using a premade puff pastry to speed up the process— or make your own pastry if that’s your thing. But if you’re stuck in a rut with the same ol’ same ol’ try this rustic, yet elegant delight. Perfection not required. Serve with a side salad and voila! Dinner’s served.

My Gouda, Caramelized Onion, Fennel, and Apple Sausage Galette is inspired by my fave pizza recipe printed in Cooking Light Magazine 2010. I’ve altered the measurements slightly to work well with the buttery puff pastry. The caramelized onions and fennel adds sweetness with a hint of licorice, the apple sausage brings a sweet, smoky, and salty bite, and the Gouda ties it all together with a creamy mild tang. Bon Appetit!

Gouda, Caramelized Onion, Fennel, and Apple Sausage Galette Ingredients

1 puff pastry thawed 30 minutes
Flour for dusting
1 cup Gouda, grated
1 apple chicken sausage link, chopped (I like Aidelles)
1 small onion, thinly sliced (about 1 cup)
1 small fennel bulb (about 1 cup) thinly sliced, outer layer removed
¼ teaspoon salt
1/8 teaspoon pepper
2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
1 teaspoon fresh chives, chopped
1 egg
1 tablespoon water

Gouda, Caramelized Onion, Fennel, and Apple Sausage Galette Instructions

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. In a small bowl, whisk together the egg and water and set aside. In a heated skillet, add about 1 tablespoon olive oil and add onions, fennel, salt, and pepper. Sauté till caramelized, about 20 minutes (will reduce to about ¾ cup).

Gouda,  Caramelized Onion, Fennel, and Apple Sausage Galette Step 1

Transfer onion mixture to a bowl and add 1 tablespoon of olive oil to the pan. Add cubed sausage and sauté till browned, careful not to burn. On parchment paper, roll pastry out until it measures about 10” square (you may need flour to keep rolling pin from sticking). Scoop caramelized onion and fennel mixture onto the center of the pastry, making about a 7” circle.

Gouda,  Caramelized Onion, Fennel, and Apple Sausage Galette Step 2

Top with the sausage.

Gouda, Caramelized Onion, Fennel, and Apple Sausage Galette Step 3

Then sprinkle the Gouda on top.

Gouda, Caramelized Onion, Fennel, and Apple Sausage Galette step 4

If you live in a warm climate, you may need to pop the galette into the freezer at this point for 10 minutes to firm up. Cold pastry is key to a flakey crust.

Fold and pinch the edges of the pastry in towards the center so that the filling is exposed with a generous crust around the edges. With a pastry brush, brush the edges of the crust with the egg mixture. This will give it a golden sheen.

Gouda, Caramelized Onion, Fennel, and Apple Sausage Galette

Transfer the parchment with the galette onto a baking sheet and bake till golden brown and bubbly, about 20-25 minutes. Garnish with chopped chives. Allow the galette to rest at least 10 minutes before cutting and serving. Makes 8 small pie slices.

Gouda, Caramelized Onion, Fennel, and Apple Sausage Galette

More Galette Recipes

Gruyere, Prosciuttto, and Poppy Seed Galette
Goat Cheese, Fig, and Prosciutto Galette
Brie and Apple Galette

Read this story from the beginning

Goût de France: Thanks, Mom!

Click here to check out Megan’s educational adventure book for kids ages 8-12!

Goût de France: Excuse My French!

French supermarket

We’ve all heard the rumors that French people hate Americans, but I was determined to prove them wrong. I was told by seasoned travelers that as long as I greeted everyone in France with a friendly “Bonjour!” I’d be golden. And I believed them.

We picked up our rent-a-car in Avignon and headed to the Intermarche grocery store in Saint-Rémy-de-Provence. After more than 24 hours of travel by plane, train, and automobile, it was 2 pm France—2 am Hawaii time. Jet-lagged to the max and longing for a comfy bed, it was also time to work my best French. I mean, how hard can it be? I did my lessons, listened to my audios. I knew the basics. Yeah right! It’s amazing how confident I’d felt with my husband and friends, learning basic French phrases on our home-turf. But in the heat of the moment— tired, starving, having to pee, and being in a foreign country–I got stage fright.

French bathroom

As soon as I revealed my American accent while asking for the toilette, I got a glare down the schnauze and a flick of the thumb pointing somewhere that way. So after three failed attempts, receiving the same reaction from three separate employees, my friend and I zipped circles aimlessly around the market about four times. We finally found the toilettes hidden in the back of the store.

How Not to Order Fromage in France

French Market

I’m still not sure how this happened, but I was nominated by my travel companions to order cheese from the Fromage counter by myself while they went to find meat at the Charcuterie. Waiting patiently while the lovely French woman behind the counter filled an order, I admired her clear olive-colored skin and long, dark corkscrew curls. I couldn’t help but smile listening to her speak French with another customer. It sounded so beautiful and super fast.

My mind wandered and I thought how cool it would be to have a friend like her in France. Maybe we’d do a house swap one day. . .

When I heard them say, “Avoir!” I was up. I took a deep breath, smiled brightly, and with all the Frenchness I had in me said “Bonjour!!” way louder than I’d anticipated, followed by a pitifully mumbled, “Parlez-vous anglais?” Surely she’d find me cute, I thought, seeing the nervous excitement on my face or at least give me an A for effort.

French Woman

Not even close. Instead, she shrugged her shoulders and with an intimidating smirk replied, “Non. Not much. “and continued busying herself behind the counter.

Excuse my French

I knew I should’ve ordered that Rosetta Stone.

Seeing I wasn’t leaving till I got some cheese, she kept her eyes down and raised her eyebrows like I was wasting her time. She added, “I guess we can try, and I’ll see what I can do.”

Hmph! Sounded like pretty good English to me!

Rather than point rudely at the cheese, I mustered a smile to disguise my hurt feelings and asked what she recommended, thinking this might soften her. Bad move.

She snipped in her thick French accent, “I do not understand what you are saying.”

Clearly I wasn’t in The Land of Aloha anymore. And clearly the Fromage Ice Queen wasn’t interested in house swapping with me anytime soon.

Doing my best not to anger her more, I quickly read the signs and blurted, “Chevre,” then in my state of panic resorted to pointing at small rounds of goat cheese, some Gouda, and Brie. They were the only ones I recognized and I was overwhelmed by the myriad of choices.

French Cheese

“What kind? How much?” she asked, coldly.

Like an idiot, I made a hand motion indicating a small amount. She just glared at me, making me feel like a total loser.

Dizzy from exhaustion and verging on tears, I looked around praying my friends would bail me out. Finally I saw them and frantically waved them over. As soon as Frenchie spied Chap and Link (our men) she freakishly changed her tone and turned into a smitten kitten-smiling, laughing, batting her lashes, and handing over the cheese. What’s up with that?

While we were walking away from the counter my husband said, “She seemed nice.”

I rolled my eyes. Whatever. Mission accomplished.

My Intermarche experience may have left a sour taste in my mouth, but it’s nothing that my sweet and savory, cheese inspired galettes can’t cure. Next time you need a pick-me-up after a challenging day, one of my comforting galettes will be sure to put the smile back on your face!

Related Links

Gouda with Caramelized Onion, Fennel, and Apple Sausage Galette
Brie and Apple Galette
Gruyere, Prosciutto, and Poppy Seed Galette
Goat Cheese, Fig, and Prosciutto Galette

Read this story from the beginning

Goût de France: Thanks, Mom!

Click here to check out Megan’s educational adventure book for kids ages 8-12!

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